Content Curation

This unit was very interesting and informative as it gave a name, “content curation”,  to what most of us do each day in our busy lives using the internet at work and for social networking.  With so much information on the web, or so many posts on Twitter and Facebook for that matter, it is impossible to read everything.  How can we decipher what is the most relevant or meaningful to us so that we can get the information we need, and choose the right resouces to find it.  Content curation is a great way to do this, either by curating the information yourself and creating a curation page, or using others curation sites as resources on a particular topic.  Creating a curation page can be another great way to continue to put yourself in a leadership position in your field around a particular topic of interest as well.

In the article, “Curating to enhance organization learning”, content curation is decribed as “the act of finding, grouping, organizing or sharing the best and most relevant content on a specific issues” (Kelly, 2013).  This article also keep the process of content curation simple by sharing three simple steps; seek, sense and share.  It further explains that a good curator or curation page has a goal, filters information with the ease of the searcher in mind, and adds value to the material shared (not just simply redistributing it).

The importance and process of curation lies in the fact that in this age of information explosion, where “studies have shown that the amount of digital information available doubles every 18 to 24 months” we need a way to be able to “replace the noise with clarity” (Kelly, 2013).  Content curation allows people a more realistic and valuable way to share resouces with like-minded professionals, from resouces that have already been read and suggested.

For my curation page I reviewed several of the recommended sites and choose Scoop. It! This site was extremely easy to use and I like the newsletter format.  I was able to comment on my posts and change pictures with a few clicks on my mouse.  I reflected back on these last two classes on “digital media” and the ‘future of education” and decided to create a curation page on MakerSpaces, which is part of my “FVE” in my afterschool program.  I thought it would tie into the courses I have already taken and my program goals.

I have begun my curation page and have shared the link below.  I have just received a grant to start creating a MakerSpace in my afterschool program so I have begun to, and will continue doing a lot of research this summer to include article and photos.  I plan to link many of these to my new curation page as resources for myself and others in the field. I’m excited to have this new skill!

http://www.scoop.it/t/makerspaces-for-kids?nosug=1

Reference:

Kelly, D. (2013). Curating to Enhance Organizational Learning. T+D, 67(2), 76-77.

Getting to Know the Makerspace Movement in Education — Emerging Education Technologies

The Makerspace Movement is Making Waves in Classrooms Everywhere. So What’s it all About? I’ve been increasingly interested in learning more about the Makerspace Movement as a teaching and learning tool. Technology can certainly play a part in being a

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.emergingedtech.com

Learn what the Makerspace movement is about.

The Makerspace Movement is Making Waves in Classrooms Everywhere. So What’s it all About? I’ve been increasingly interested in learning more about the Makerspace Movement as a teaching and learning tool. Technology can certainly play a part in being a

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.emergingedtech.com

Learn what the Makerspace movement is about.

Lessons Learned from a Pop-Up Makerspace for Kids | Make:

Over the last two weeks a founding team of makers and educators affiliated with HTINK, a New York based technology education cooperative, transformed an ar

Sourced through Scoop.it from: makezine.com

Some great insights into tips to making the space work for you and your program or classroom!

Over the last two weeks a founding team of makers and educators affiliated with HTINK, a New York based technology education cooperative, transformed an ar

Sourced through Scoop.it from: makezine.com

Some great insights into tips to making the space work for you and your program or classroom!

School Makerspaces Should Spark Innovation

It is obvious from the popularity of the maker movement – as well as design thinking, project based curricula, and career and technical schools – that young people crave the opportunity to work with their hands and to create.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.scoop.it

It is obvious from the popularity of the maker movement – as well as design thinking, project based curricula, and career and technical schools – that young people crave the opportunity to work with their hands and to create.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.scoop.it

Digital Citizenship…does privacy exist on the internet?

I’m not sure that there is an expectation of privacy for most people on the internet anymore.  We hear stories of people’s accounts getting hacked, private information being shared, or even people having  their identity stolen on a pretty regular basis.  Even when people take the time to copyright their material, it can be changed, or used in a way that wasn’t intended by the original author.  It can be downright scary!    As Williams states, “while the internet promises endless convenience to our homes and lives, it has significant implications on personal privacy”. (para. 1)  He goes on to say that “the amount of data collected about each and every one of us via our connected devices is increasing exponentially. This data can be used to paint a picture of our lives in more detail than ever before”.  (para. 6)

With this in mind we need to each take a stand on our own beliefs and action in the digital world.  First, it’s important to note that we do have some control over our privacy.   Ensuring that we safeguard passwords, use firewalls on our computers, and don’t share personal information with just anyone, or any website, are all good ways to protect ourselves.  Secondly, we need to start practicing good digital citizenship ourselves, which is a concept that helps technology users to use technology in an appropriate and respectful manner.  It includes an understanding of such topics as digital etiquette, digital rights and responsibilities and digital security to name a few.  It really is about how we should “act” online.  Because technology is ever more accessible and being used so frequently, we need to continually assess and determine our priorities in terms of digital citizenship. (Ribble, 2011)

My personal digital citizenship statement:

“I will act safely, respectfully and responsibly online so that the digital footprint I leave behind is a positive one, and promotes best practices in the digital world”.

9Elements-of-digital-citizenship

References:

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital Citizenship in Schools. Eugene, Or: International Society for Technology in Education [ISTE].

Williams, J. L. (2016). Privacy in the Age of the Internet of Things. Human Rights, 41(4), 14.